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Fragment of bronze sword.
Athens, National Archaeological Museum

Fragment of bronze sword.

Athens, National Archaeological Museum

Athens, National Archaeological Museum

Athens, National Archaeological Museum

Agamemnon’s Face Mask
Athens, National Archaeological Museum

Agamemnon’s Face Mask

Athens, National Archaeological Museum

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Athens, National Archaeological Museum

Athens, National Archaeological Museum

Athens, National Archaeological Museum

Athens, National Archaeological Museum

Attic sarcophagos. Pentelic marble. Found at Ayios Ioannis, Patras. The sarcophagos has saddle lid. One long and one narrow side bear a depiction of the hunt for the Calydonian boar, in which Meleager and Atalanta took part. On the other long side is a depiction of the two confronted lions with a large kantharos between them. The other narrow  side has a griffin pulling down an ox. From an Attic workshop. AD 150-170.
Athens, National Archaeological Museum

Attic sarcophagos. Pentelic marble. Found at Ayios Ioannis, Patras. The sarcophagos has saddle lid. One long and one narrow side bear a depiction of the hunt for the Calydonian boar, in which Meleager and Atalanta took part. On the other long side is a depiction of the two confronted lions with a large kantharos between them. The other narrow  side has a griffin pulling down an ox. From an Attic workshop. AD 150-170.

Athens, National Archaeological Museum

Attic sarcophagos. Pentelic marble. Found at Ayios Ioannis, Patras. The sarcophagos has saddle lid. One long and one narrow side bear a depiction of the hunt for the Calydonian boar, in which Meleager and Atalanta took part. On the other long side is a depiction of the two confronted lions with a large kantharos between them. The other narrow  side has a griffin pulling down an ox. From an Attic workshop. AD 150-170.
Athens, National Archaeological Museum

Attic sarcophagos. Pentelic marble. Found at Ayios Ioannis, Patras. The sarcophagos has saddle lid. One long and one narrow side bear a depiction of the hunt for the Calydonian boar, in which Meleager and Atalanta took part. On the other long side is a depiction of the two confronted lions with a large kantharos between them. The other narrow  side has a griffin pulling down an ox. From an Attic workshop. AD 150-170.

Athens, National Archaeological Museum

Athens, National Archaeological Museum

Athens, National Archaeological Museum

Found near the Monastery of Loukou, Arkadia. The relief has the form of a naiskos. The youth in the middle has been identified with Polydeukion, the favourite pupil of Herodes Atticus, who was heroised by his master after he died in his teens. The youth’s nudity, the horse, and the snake that is feeding characterise him as a hero. A young slave holds out his helmet. Behind the slave is depicted a grave mark, a loutrophoros on a pedestal. After the middle of the 2nd c. AD.
Athens, National Archaeological Museum

Found near the Monastery of Loukou, Arkadia. The relief has the form of a naiskos. The youth in the middle has been identified with Polydeukion, the favourite pupil of Herodes Atticus, who was heroised by his master after he died in his teens. The youth’s nudity, the horse, and the snake that is feeding characterise him as a hero. A young slave holds out his helmet. Behind the slave is depicted a grave mark, a loutrophoros on a pedestal. After the middle of the 2nd c. AD.

Athens, National Archaeological Museum

Statue of a sleeping Maenad. Pentelic marble. South of the Athenian Acropolis. The statue presumably decorated a luxury residence. The Maenad is asleep, lying on a panther skin on a rocky surface. The type is known as the reclining Hermaphrodite. The work expresses the Classicism trend of an Attic workshop. Time of the Emperor Hadrian (AD 117-138).
Athens, National Archaeological Museum

Statue of a sleeping Maenad. Pentelic marble. South of the Athenian Acropolis. The statue presumably decorated a luxury residence. The Maenad is asleep, lying on a panther skin on a rocky surface. The type is known as the reclining Hermaphrodite. The work expresses the Classicism trend of an Attic workshop. Time of the Emperor Hadrian (AD 117-138).

Athens, National Archaeological Museum

Athens, National Archaeological Museum

Athens, National Archaeological Museum

Statue of a fighting Gaul. Parian marble. Found in the Agora of the Italians on Delos. The warrior, wounded in the thigh, has fallen to the ground on his right knee, and will have been attempting to defend himself against his enemy with his left arm. On the ground, next to him rests a Galatian helmet. Typical example of Late Hellenistic sculpture with features of the Pergamene school. According to one view the statue was probably made by the sculptor Agasias, about 100 BC.
Athens, National Archaeological Museum

Statue of a fighting Gaul. Parian marble. Found in the Agora of the Italians on Delos. The warrior, wounded in the thigh, has fallen to the ground on his right knee, and will have been attempting to defend himself against his enemy with his left arm. On the ground, next to him rests a Galatian helmet. Typical example of Late Hellenistic sculpture with features of the Pergamene school. According to one view the statue was probably made by the sculptor Agasias, about 100 BC.

Athens, National Archaeological Museum

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Lion from funerary monument. Pentelic marble. Found in the ancient cemetery if the Kerameikos, Athens. Probably came from the funerary enclosure of Dionysos, of the deme of Kollytos, and cousin of the orator Hypereides. The two animals, originally placed at the edges of the enclosure, are shown facing in opposite directions and defending their prey, the head of a bull that can be seen beneath their paws. lions, like the bull that crowned the central naiskos in the Kerameikos enclosure, are associated with the cult of Dionysos and therefore with the name of the deceased, Dionysos. 325-300 BC.
Athens, National Archaeological Museum

Lion from funerary monument. Pentelic marble. Found in the ancient cemetery if the Kerameikos, Athens. Probably came from the funerary enclosure of Dionysos, of the deme of Kollytos, and cousin of the orator Hypereides. The two animals, originally placed at the edges of the enclosure, are shown facing in opposite directions and defending their prey, the head of a bull that can be seen beneath their paws. lions, like the bull that crowned the central naiskos in the Kerameikos enclosure, are associated with the cult of Dionysos and therefore with the name of the deceased, Dionysos. 325-300 BC.

Athens, National Archaeological Museum